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Archive
August 1999

Short news items with a Post-Polio element gleaned from 'here, there and everywhere'. Contributions welcomed. Email linpolioweb@loncps.demon.co.uk. Please make it clear that your news item is for inclusion in NewsBites and include any source references.

30th August 1999
Polio Survivors in the News.

Wanda Royal.

In an article dated August 30th, Alice Thrasher, Staff writer at the Fayetteville (N.C.) Observer-Times (http://www.fayettevillenc.com/), tells the story of Wanda Royal, a polio survivor who "used to love to ski, even though she battled pain in her right leg after a day on the slopes."

"I would ski for two to three hours and would take youth groups skiing every winter for 12 years,"she says. "My family every year would go on big ski trips to West Virginia."

The ski trips are just memories for the 43-year-old ordained minister now.

Her snow skiing trips ended after the severe pains of post polio syndrome began hitting her in 1997, 40 years after she was treated for polio as an infant.

The article continues with some basic information about PPS and then returns to relate Wanda's story...

Royal takes morphine for pain and muscle relaxants and other medicines for sore muscles to help her get through each day. She walks with a cane when she goes out, and can still drive to the grocery store when she is having a good day.

The pain caused by her post polio syndrome has caused such depression, she says, she even considered ways to end her life on two occasions.

"I would just start crying, feeling the desperation you would feel that you can't live with this pain," Royal says. "I would get up and look at the sunshine and just start crying. You would feel like life was never going to get better."

Royal has tried all kinds of therapies, prescription drugs, over-the-counter painkillers and herbs. She has had to switch medications whenever one kind quit working.

The morphine tablets she takes now don't kill all the pain. "But the pain is not in the forefront all the time," she says.

While she talks, she massages her right wrist with her stronger left hand. Just getting dressed in the morning is painful and it takes a long time, she says.

A life of pain has been a blow to the formerly outgoing woman who had spent most of her adult life visiting the sick, praying for others and being "a doer of the word."

We are then taken back over Wanda's life from when she earned a master's degree in divinity from Southern Baptist Theological Seminary and a bachelor of science degree from East Carolina University, through her time first as a teacher and then a minister, to the present. She has not worked for more than a year and is "waiting for word on her application for disability from Social Security, but doesn't know how she will be able to pay her mortgage, medical bills and medicine on the projected $661 a month in disability benefits."

Royal got a personal computer in the spring of 1998 has been able to use it for a short periods on her better days. She is compiling a family history for the Royal family and communicates with friends and relatives around the country. She has a problem typing on the keyboard because her left hand gets ahead of her right hand sometimes...

"I hope to send the book to the printers in mid-September and hope that we can include any family that will send me information,"she says. She took the draft of the book to the Royal family reunion this summer and is taking orders at $45, which is mainly to cover costs of the book. A friend lent her a flatbed scanner to scan family photographs onto computer disks to send to the printer.

The project has helped provide a sense of accomplishment after fighting the pain and depression for nearly two years. "It has saved my sanity," she says.

The article returns to the subject of PPS and Wanda describes in some detail the development of her symptoms and the various treatments, largely unsuccessful, she went through to try to reduce the pain.

Her current doctor is a family physician in Fayetteville who has worked with her in pain management with a combination of drugs. Methadone was used was a while until it stopped being effective.

"God was watching over me by give me a caring family physician," Royal says.

"What's ahead for me?" Royal wrote in a journal this spring. "I don't know honestly.

"I fight depression every day because I exist and do not live. I can't do much because pain will come, so I sit and exist."

For information on Wanda Royal's book on Royal Family history. People can write to her at 4120 Wade-Stedman Road, Wade 28395 or send her email at wannag@aol.com.

The complete text of the news report, copyright © 1999 Fayetteville (N.C.) Observer-Times can be found at http://www.fayettevillenc.com/foto/news/content/1999/tx99aug/f30t1axx.htm
! The above document is no longer available. !

Notification of the above news item was received via NewsIndex http://www.newsindex.com/

[ Index ]

26th August 1999
Polio Survivors in the News.

Esperanza Belmont and Saul Mendoza compete at the Roosevelt Cup games.

In an article dated August 25th, Harry Franklin, State Editor of the Ledger-Enquirer (http://www.l-e-o.com/), reports on the Roosevelt Cup games from Warm Springs, Georgia. The games are not limited to Polio Survivors and the article also highlights the participation of Marvin Palomino (Mexico), Derek Bolton (U.S.A.), Anthony Lara (U.S.A.), Karin Korb (U.S.A.) and Nikki Salzburg (U.S.A.).

Esperanto Belmont, wife of Marvin Palomino, is a polio survivor and "the seventh-ranked woman wheelchair tennis player in Mexico for the sixth straight year."

Saul Mendoza, also from Mexico,

...was stricken with polio when he was a year old. But he never let a disability slow him down. He won the Peachtree Road Race July 4 in Atlanta. He ranks No. 1 in the world in the 800 meters after setting a world record time of 1 minute, 34 seconds in another race, and holds the fastest time in the world in the 10,000 meters at 9 minutes, 40 seconds.

A racing professional who spends about eight months a year in Georgia, training in Atlanta, Warm Springs and on Pine Mountain, Mendoza has an exuberant attitude about life. His goal in tournaments is to "just have fun. I just love racing. Winning a medal is part of it but I just love to jump in my chair and have fun. I can make a decent life out of racing."

The games are hosted by the Roosevelt Institute at Warm Springs.

Hosting the Roosevelt Cup games is a thrill, said Frank Ruzycki, executive director of Roosevelt Institute. The games were started in Warm Springs last year. "We're excited about having teams from seven countries here to compete," he said. "These games continue to help us promote our mission of personal independence and caring for persons with disabilities."

Ruzycki said he is especially pleased that athletes no longer have to travel to another site to play tennis, like they did last year. He praised Rotary International, which provided the funds to build Roosevelt Institute's newly completed tennis courts. And he hopes more countries will participate when the competition resumes in 2001.

Events start yesterday with the basketball competition, as teams from Japan, Australia, Canada, Mexico, The Netherlands and the United States take to the court. Competition in track and tennis begin today, Thursday, with all events ending Saturday. Teams from seven countries, including Great Britain, are competing in various events.

The complete text of the news report can be found at http://www.l-e-o.com/news/0825ROOSEVELTCUP4net.htm
! The above document is no longer available. !

Notification of the above news item was received via NewsIndex http://www.newsindex.com/

For information about the Roosevelt Warm Springs Institute for Rehabilitation see their entry in our Specialist Clinics and Health Professionals Directory.

[ Index ]

23rd August 1999
Conference and Seminar News.

"Into The Millennium Post-Polio From Head To Toe"
February 19th, 2000
Boca Raton, Florida, U.S.A.

The Boca Area Post Polio Group are presenting their first one day conference at the Embassy Suites, Boca Raton, Florida. Dr. Richard Bruno and Dr. Carol Vandenakker are the invited speaker.

Full details including information from the conference brochure can be accessed via Card #0010 in our World-Wide Conference and Seminar Diary

[ Index ]

19th August 1999
Polio Eradication Update.

First Case Of Polio In Kosovo.

An Agence France Presse (http://www.afp.com/) report dated Aug 18, 1999 available on Central Europe Online (http://www.centraleurope.com/), quotes a World Health Organization statement released in Geneva warning that the people of Kosovo are facing a new threat in the shape of epidemic diseases.

The first cases of epidemic diseases including hepatitis A and polio have been diagnosed in the province and urgent measures must be taken to avoid further infection, the WHO said in a statement released in Geneva.

"It is becoming increasingly urgent to re-establish health systems capable of containing the spread of infectious diseases," the statement said.

A case of polio was detected in a three-year-old boy on August 11 in the main hospital of Pristina, Kosovo's capital. He came from a poor area of the province and had not been vaccinated.

The report goes on to document cases of jaundice and hemorrhagic fever before highlighting the poor vaccination record in Kosovo in recent years.

The WHO noted that vaccination programs in Kosovo had been insufficient over the last four years. A 1996 study by UNICEF showed that only 53 percent of two-year-olds had been given a complete set of vaccinations against polio and measles. Subsequent vaccination programs had missed out many children.

"The region is therefore exposed to a serious risk of a major epidemic if the polio virus is reintroduced," the WHO said.

The WHO is planning to vaccinate every child in Kosovo under the age of five years against polio, measles and other diseases.

The complete text of the news report can be found at http://www.centraleurope.com/news.php3?id=86288.

Notification of the above news items was received via NewsIndex http://www.newsindex.com/

For Polio eradication and vaccine related resources see our directory Polio Virus, Vaccine and Eradication

[ Index ]

18th August 1999
Polio Eradication Update.

New Congo ceasefire declared.

BBC News Online (http://news.bbc.co.uk/) reports:

Tuesday, August 17, 1999 Published at 19:01 GMT 20:01 UK

Uganda and Rwanda have declared a new ceasefire in their battle for control of the city of Kisangani in the Democratic Republic of Congo.

The agreement came in a joint communique signed by the Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni and Rwandan Vice-President Paul Kagame, after a meeting between the two men at a Ugandan safari lodge.

According to the statement, the ceasefire should come into effect immediately.

Rwanda and Uganda also reiterated their support for the peace agreement aimed at ending the war in DR Congo signed in Lusaka in July.

A Rwandan commander based in Kisangani told the BBC earlier that he was confident both sides were ready to stop fighting, but the rebel leader, Ernest Wamba dia Wamba, who is backed by Uganda, has since accused Rwanda of continuing to attack his positions.

The report also refers to a letter to the United Nations Security Council president from the Congolese ambassador Andre Kapanga in which he said the Council must put pressure on Kampala and Kigali to get the rebels to sign the Lusaka ceasefire agreement.

Mr Kapanga also urged the Council to "state and condemn" the interruption of a polio vaccination programme set to protect 10 million children in the country.

Fighting in DR Congo has trapped women and children in clinics where they came for the vaccination programme.

UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan said on Monday that the fighting violated a truce which he had requested and which all parties had endorsed to allow the vaccination programme to continue unhindered in August.

In an article dated 16th August CNN (http://www.cnn.com/) reports:

[Congolese government] Health Minister Mashako Mamba told state television on Sunday night the fighting had disrupted electricity supplies in the city, ruining 3 million refrigerated doses of vaccine.

Mashako said the vaccination program, part of a U.N. drive against the last major vestiges of polio in the world, had been "seriously jeopardized by the barbaric behavior of the Rwandan and Ugandan occupation troops."

The complete text of the BBC News Online report can be found at http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/world/africa/newsid_422000/422772.stm.

The complete text of the CNN report can be found at http://www.cnn.com/WORLD/africa/9908/16/congo.01/index.html.

Notification of the CNN news item was received via NewsIndex http://www.newsindex.com/

For Polio eradication and vaccine related resources see our directory Polio Virus, Vaccine and Eradication

[ Index ]

17th August 1999
Polio Eradication Update.

Polio vaccination campaign becomes casualty of renewed fighting in Congo.

Fighting between Rwandan and Ugandan troops stationed in the north-east part of the Democratic Republic of Congo is, according to Hrvoje Hranjski of Associated Press, causing serious problems for the U.N.-sponsored polio vaccination campaign. Reporting from Kisangani at 8.17 a.m. ET (1218 GMT) on August 16, 1999, he writes:

One casualty of the war was a U.N.-sponsored polio vaccination campaign aimed at 10 million Congolese children.

Doctors and nurses overseeing the drive in Kisangani remained holed up in their homes, and local UNICEF workers said they were having trouble preserving the polio vaccination, which must be used within 24 hours and kept cool. Electrical generators were operating only erratically.

The complete text of the news report can be found at http://www.foxnews.com/js_index.sml?
content=/news/international/0816/i_ap_0816_38.sml.

Notification of the above news items was received via NewsIndex http://www.newsindex.com/

For Polio eradication and vaccine related resources see our directory Polio Virus, Vaccine and Eradication

[ Index ]

16th August 1999
Polio Eradication Roundup.

Africa News Online (New Vision): Kiyonga Visits Moroto.

August 8, 1999.

In Africa News Online (http://www.africanews.org/) Charles Wendo of New Vision (Kampala) reports:

The Minister of Health Dr. Crispus Kiyonga [on] Saturday flew to Moroto to oversee the polio immunization in north Eastern Uganda. Health Ministry officials said the minister is expected to visit Moroto, Kotido and Kitgum districts.

"He usually participates in the monitoring of National Immunization Days, as the political leader of the ministry he takes charge and sometimes takes decisions on the spot," a health ministry official said.

In parts of Luwero and Mpigi districts, morning rains delayed the exercise, but the turn up was improving by midday. In Nakatonya centre, Bombo town in Luwero District, 97 children had been immunized by 2.00pm compared to 197 immunized last year in two days. Immunization officials at Wakiso Health Centre Mpigi district,said 20 children had been immunized by 1.00pm out of a targeted 250.

The complete text of the news report can be found at http://www.africanews.org/east/uganda/stories/19990808_feat3.html.

Africa News Online (New Vision): "Polio: First Round Ends Successfully."

August 9, 1999.

In Africa News Online (http://www.africanews.org/) Charles Wendo of New Vision (Kampala) reports:

The first round of this year's polio immunisation ended yesterday with some centres around Kampala and Entebbe registering better, while others had worse turn up than last year, reports Charles Wendo.

Reports from upcountry indicate that more children were immunised yesterday (Sunday) than Saturday, said Paul Kagwa, deputy to the assistant commissioner for health in charge of health education. In Luzira prisons barracks where over 600 children had been immunised by mid afternoon yesterday, officials attributed the good turn-up to early mobilisation.

Some children walked themselves to the immunisation centres. Kitoro Health Centre in Entebbe had immunised 213 children out of a targeted 290 by 2.pm. By lunch time, St. Joseph's centre in Kawuku near Entebbe had immunised over 180 out of a targeted 300. Officials said the turn-up was better than last year. The immunisation exercise to be repeated on September 25 and 26, is part of a world- wide effort to eradicate polio. Centres which were registering poorer turn-ups included Kigungu fish landing site in Entebbe, Kisenyi Health Centre and Kiswa Health Centre both in Kampala.

Rains and misconceptions were blamed for the poor turn-up, while some people did not think they needed to immunise their children again after it had been done in the previous years. Nurses at Abaita Babiri near Entebbe said they laboured to explain that the vaccine was safe.

The complete text of the news report can be found at http://www.africanews.org/east/uganda/stories/19990809_feat6.html.

Africa News Online (New Vision): Fight Will Be Won.

August 10, 1999.

In Africa News Online (http://www.africanews.org/) New Vision (Kampala) Editorial comments:

The first round of the 1999 National Immunisations Days(NIDs) against polio was successfully concluded. Health Minister Dr Crispus Kiyonga led by example when he flew to Moroto to oversee the exercise in the North-East. The heavy downpour on Saturday did not deter thousands of parents to take the children for immunisation.

There is a dramatic change of attitude in the fight against polio. Congratulations. It is good that traditional institutions and their leaders are out in force to support the battle against polio. This translates into a healthy people and nation.

At the start of the polio war, some politicians openly defied logic and mobilised their constituents to shun the exercise. Certain radio stations joined the queue and strongly opposed the Ministry of Health.

Parents, perplexed by the confused signals, shied away from the immunisation centres fearing for the welfare of their children. They feared massive crippling by the vaccine.

It is a different picture today. Previously misguided politicians, opinion leaders and media houses have seen the light. They are fully supporting the exercise. The war, however, is not over. Fresh reports indicate that Mbarara- based Greater African Radio is leading a crusade to derail the polio campaign. They advance a conspiracy theory, claiming the vaccine is to wipe out Africans.

The complete text of the editorial can be found at http://www.africanews.org/east/uganda/stories/19990810_feat9.html.

Africa News Online (IRIN): "DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC OF CONGO: Vaccination truce in "most" areas."

August 11, 1999.

In Africa News Online (http://www.africanews.org/) UN Integrated Regional Information Network (IRIN) reports:

Warring parties in the DRC have stopped fighting in most areas of the country so that some 10 million children can be vaccinated against polio during the coming weekend, a statement from UN headquarters in New York said on Tuesday.

The statement, received by IRIN, said UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan, who had appealed for "Days of Tranquility" to allow immunisation to go ahead, had received assurances from DRC President Laurent-Desire Kabila and rebel leaders that they would lay down their weapons. Even with continued localised fighting, relief agencies believe that the campaign can reach over 95 percent of children under five years, the statement said.

Volunteers will staff some 16,000 immunisation posts throughout the country with the support of UNICEF and WHO - the UN agencies spearheading efforts to eradicate polio from the world by the end of the year 2000. The DRC has the most intense virus transmission in the world, the statement said. "In the eradication effort we need to gain access to children in pockets of unrest and strife," WHO Director-General Gro Harlem Brundtland was quoted as saying. "If we miss a single village we will fail," Brundtland said.

Supplies dispatched for campaign

Some four million doses of polio vaccines have already been distributed in eastern DRC for the campaign, while main distribution points in government-controlled western DRC have received nearly all the supplies required, UNICEF said in a report received by IRIN on Tuesday. The evacuation of expatriate humanitarian workers from Kisangani would not affect the vaccination campaign in that area, the report said.

This item is delivered by the UN's IRIN humanitarian information unit (e-mail: irin@ocha.unon.org; fax: +254 2 622129; Web: http://www.reliefweb.int/IRIN), but may not necessarily reflect the views of the United Nations. If you re-print, copy, archive or re-post this item, please retain this credit and disclaimer.

The complete text of the news report can be found at http://www.africanews.org/east/stories/19990811_feat2.html.

Notification of the above news items was received via NewsIndex http://www.newsindex.com/

For Polio eradication and vaccine related resources see our directory Polio Virus, Vaccine and Eradication

[ Index ]

15th August 1999
Polio Survivors in the News.

Carol W. Hunstein.

Laurie Asseo, Associated Press Writer, reports in an article published Monday, August 9, 1999

Georgia Supreme Court Justice Carol W. Hunstein overcame polio and the amputation of a leg from cancer before she even thought of going to law school. After she became a lawyer, things still weren't always easy.

"There was a particular judge in DeKalb County who used to refer to me as 'little lady," ' says Hunstein, who was honored with four other women [on] Sunday by the American Bar Association's Commission on Women in the Profession. "He wasn't fair to me and the result was he wasn't fair to my clients."

"He was the reason that I actually ran for the judgeship" in DeKalb County in 1984, Hunstein said in an interview. "I said, 'At least I know I can be fair and impartial." '

Eight years later, then-Gov. Zell Miller named her to the state Supreme Court.

The five women received the Margaret Brent Women Lawyers of Achievement Award, named after America's first female lawyer, who practiced during the 1630s and unsuccessfully demanded the right to vote.

"Years ago, we were not treated very professionally by anyone involved in the judicial system or the legal system," Hunstein told a packed ballroom audience. "It is because of what we have overcome that women have worked toward achieving equality for all, not just for women."

Hunstein had polio when she was 18 months old, bone cancer at age 4 and another bout with cancer at age 23 that led to the amputation of a leg below the knee.

Her father did not think girls needed a college education, so she married at 17, had a child a year later and was divorced by age 22. She went to college on a state vocational rehabilitation scholarship and to law school on Social Security she received after her former husband died.

"I'm hoping I've repaid the government for the help it has given me," Hunstein said in the interview. She heads Georgia's equality commission, aimed at ending gender, racial and ethnic bias in the state justice system.

"I don't think I would be where I am if it were not for a lot of women who have committed themselves to equality for women," Hunstein said. "I hope that I can reach out and help women today."

The full text of Laurie Asseo's article was originally published in the Star Tribune under the title ' 'Little Lady' ' Comment Spurred Judge and at flash.al.com as Georgia woman jurist honored for achievement over adversities. A report by Gail Appleson/Reuters under the headline Georgia justice overcomes polio, cancer, poverty and discrimination can also be found at the Nando Times. !The latter document no longer available.!

See also:
The American Bar Association's Commission on Women in the Profession at http://www.abanet.org/women/home.html.

Lee Kwok-wah.

Agnes Lam reports in an article last week in the South China Morning Post:

Open University students often have to juggle their families and careers with their classes. But for Lee Kwok-wah, just getting to lectures was the hardest part of his degree.

The father-of-two and centre supervisor for the Hong Kong Association of the Deaf was celebrating his graduation yesterday, but he admitted that his course in business administration was far from plain sailing.

"It was really tough, especially for people with disabilities. Sometimes I found it hard to reach the places where I had tutorials and lessons," said Mr Lee, 38, who suffers from polio.

"Sometimes the university could make some special arrangements for me, but not all the time."

The full text of the article can be found at !http://www.scmp.com/News/HongKong/Article/
FullText_asp_ArticleID-19990810022612104.asp! This document no longer available.

Notification of the above news items was received via NewsIndex http://www.newsindex.com/

[ Index ]

14th August 1999
BBC News Online - Health: Care plans 'could force sick into homes'.

Friday, August 13, 1999 Published at 17:03 GMT 18:03 UK

By The BBC's Angus Crawford

Several thousand sick and disabled people may be forced out of their homes and back into institutions by new government proposals, according to campaigners.

They say plans to change the way home carers are employed will mean a 50% increase in costs.

The government plans to apply the European working time directive and the minimum wage to people who work as self-employed carers.

Carers will become employees of the agencies which will then have to pay national insurance, holiday and sick pay and on top of all that VAT.

As a result approximately 75% of money paid by clients will go direct to the Treasury.

The complete text of the news report can be found at http://news.bbc.co.uk/hi/english/health/newsid_419000/419489.stm

[ Index ]

1st August 1999
Polio Eradication Roundup.

Africa News Online (PANA): Mozambique Undertakes Anti-Polio Vaccination Campaign.

July 28, 1999.

In Africa News Online (http://www.africanews.org/) the Panafrican News Agency (PANA) reports:

MAPUTO, Mozambique (PANA) - A nationwide campaign against polio is underway in Mozambique in a bid to wipe out the crippling disease.

The campaign was launched in Maputo Monday by the country's prime minister, Pascoal Mocumbi, who urged all parents to ensure that all children under the age of five are vaccinated against the disease.

"Many of our children still suffer from a variety of diseases, and so all parents are called upon to ensure that their children are vaccinated," the national news agency quoted him as saying.

The fact that the country has advanced towards the total eradication of polio, he added, was because the people have been massively supporting the annual vaccination campaigns.

Mozambican health authorities expect to give 3.3 million children the oral vaccine in 1999. The first dose is being applied this week, and a second dose will be given from 30 August to 3 September.

The complete text of the news report can be found at http://www.africanews.org/south/mozambique/stories/19990728_feat2.html

Africa News Online (PANA): Japan Gives Burkina Faso 530 Million Francs To Combat Polio.

July 28, 1999.

In Africa News Online (http://www.africanews.org/) the Panafrican News Agency (PANA) reports:

OUAGADOUGOU, Burkina Faso (PANA) - The Japanese government and Unicef have signed a financial pact under which Japan agreed to give Burkina Faso about 530 million CFA francs toward the purchase of vaccines against poliomyelitis.

According to the agreement, signed Tuesday in Ouagadougou, the amount will fund the 4th national immunization days, scheduled for next November and December.

The minister-Counsellor at the Japanese Embassy in Oaugadougou, Yoshimasa Tezuka, recalled that during the 2nd Tokyo International Conference on Africa's Development, the Japan promised to fund medical and educational projects in African countries the cost of 400 billion francs.

The 530 million francs donation represents the first materialisation of this commitment.

The complete text of the news report can be found at http://www.africanews.org/west/burkinafaso/stories/19990728_feat2.html

Africa News Online (The Times of Zambia): Luangwa polio drive hits target

July 28, 1999.

In Africa News Online (http://www.africanews.org/) The Times of Zambia reports:

Lusaka - The Luangwa district health management team (LDHMT) has scored more than 95 per cent in the first polio immunisation programme launched by the district council chairman Patrick Ngoma on Thursday last week with 4,758 under five children vaccinated against the deadly disease.

District director of health Alexandra Musole said yesterday that the district had estimated for 4,949 children under five and the vaccination of 4,758 which represented 96.1 per cent of the population was a great achievement compared to last years first round of 74 per cent. Mr. Musole said that his team was happy that all of their centres had almost reached their targets especially where community health workers were used as lay vaccinators.

Luangwa is among the 36 districts that are conducting the polio immunisation programme because it did not reach the required 95 per cent target.

The complete text of the news report can be found at http://www.africanews.org/central/zambia/stories/19990728_feat19.html

Africa News Online (PANA): DRC To Vaccinate 10 Million Children.

July 29, 1999.

In Africa News Online (http://www.africanews.org/) the Panafrican News Agency (PANA) reports:

Dakar, Senegal (PANA) - The Democratic Republic of Congo, for the first time, is to embark on full nationwide vaccination campaigns in the next three months to immunize nearly 10 million children under the age of five against polio.

The Regional Director for Africa, Dr. Ebrahim Samba, confirmed that all belligerents in the Congo conflict had agreed to a cessation of hostilities to ensure the success of the exercise, to be carried out in three phases.

A WHO news release issued Thursday from Harare said the three rounds of National Immunization Days are scheduled for 13-15 August, 17-19 September and 22-24 October.

The complete text of the news report can be found at http://www.africanews.org/central/congo-kinshasa/stories/19990729_feat4.html

Notification of the above news items was received via NewsIndex http://www.newsindex.com/

For Polio eradication and vaccine related resources see our directory Polio Virus, Vaccine and Eradication

[ Index ]

DATELINE
30th August 1999
Polio Survivors in the News.
*
26th August 1999
Polio Survivors in the News.
*
23rd August 1999
Conference and Seminar News.
*
19th August 1999
Polio Eradication Update.
*
18th August 1999
Polio Eradication Update.
*
17th August 1999
Polio Eradication Update.
*
16th August 1999
Polio Eradication Roundup.
*
15th August 1999
Polio Survivors in the News.
*
14th August 1999
Care plans 'could force sick into homes' (UK).
*
1st August 1999
Polio Eradication Roundup.
*
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