Lincolnshire Post-Polio Library - A Service of The Lincolnshire Post-Polio Network
[ Reception ][ Library ][ Networking ][ Directory ][ What's New? ]
[ Not Used ][ Not Used ][ Not Used ][ Not Used ][ Search Site ]

Catalogue

Dr. Henry writes.....

Henry Holland MD, is a polio survivor, a board certified psychiatrist and a Clinical Professor of Psychiatry in the School of Medicine of the Medical College of Virginia of Virginia Commonwealth University in Richmond, Virginia, USA. He has been President of the Central Virginia (Richmond) PPS Support Group for the past five years and has been re-elected for a 6th year. He had a serious case of polio at age 11 in 1950 and accepted a permanent tracheostomy in 1970. His PPS symptoms started in 1990; and he was recently forced by them to give up his practice.

Tom Walter

See also Henry Holland MD - Medical Credentials.

IMPORTANT NOTES FOR FIRST-TIME READERS

Catalogue Entry Index

Select title in catalogue entry index to display summary details of article, select title in summary to display full text of article

[ Previous ]
[ Catalogue Index ]
[ Next ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes as a retired physician-psychiatrist with PPS
[ Full Text Here ] Also reproduced in Issue No.3 - January 1997 of LINK-PIN
Author(s): Henry Holland MD
Original Publication: SJU Polio mailing list.
Abstract/Extract: My name is Henry Holland. I am a retired (on disability due to PPS) physician-psychiatrist. I have learned a lot from reading the postings to the Post-Polio Mailing Lists. I have noticed considerable questioning about medical matters in regard to PPS, various pros. and cons. of medications, and a variety of alternative and non-traditional treatments for PPS which may help some but not others. As a physician, I have observed a fair amount of doctor bashing, much of which may be justified. I have decided to begin posting to possibly be of some help to other PPSers and hopefully to provide some medical balance. I will begin by telling you my abbreviated polio history.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about Ambien
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD
Original Publication: SJU Polio mailing list. [Note this Library edition has been updated].
Abstract/Extract: I have personally prescribed Ambien for patients for longer than one month time periods, but in PPSers, one must be convinced that the Ambien is not hiding an underlying respiratory or sleep apnea problem and that the Ambien is not contributing to an underlying respiratory problem. If there is an existent sleep apnea problem or respiratory difficulties, Ambien should be used with caution and only under the supervison of a physician familiar with PPS as it may intensify the existent problem.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about antidepressant medications
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD
Original Publication: SJU Polio mailing list.
Abstract/Extract: I am a little surprised at the concern about the use of antidepressant medications in the treatment of PPS.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about Bulbar and spinal polio
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD
Original Publication: SJU Polio mailing list.
Abstract/Extract: Bulbar polio involved the brain stem where the centers for the cranial nerves are located. The cranial nerves involve smell (olfactory), vision (optic), three cranial nerves control the various muscles that control eyeball movements, the trigeminal nerve and facial nerve which innervate cheeks, tears, gums, and muscles of the face,etc, the auditory nerve which provides hearing, the glossopharyngeal nerve which controls in part swallowing, and functions in the throat, another cranial nerve which controls tongue movement and taste and one that actually sends signals to the heart, intestines, respiratory(lungs) and the accessory nerve that controls upper neck movement.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about "Christina's World"
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD
Original Publication: Central Va PPS Support Group (PPSG)'s newsletter, The Deja View, April/May 2000 issue.
Abstract/Extract: In David McCullough's Truman there is a recounting of the events that occurred in 1948 during the election campaign between Harry Truman and Thomas Dewey. One paragraph in the biography reads, "It was the year, too, of Christina's World, a haunting portrait by Andrew Wyeth of a crippled woman and a forsaken house on a bleak New England hill…that would become one of the most popular paintings ever done by an American."

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about Debilitating Fatigue
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD
Original Publication: Central Va PPS Support Group (PPSG)'s newsletter, The Deja View, in 1996.
Abstract/Extract: As you may recall, several months ago, I wrote about the problems that many polios face with fatigue. Many experience peripheral muscle fatigue which may manifest itself with muscle weakness and/or pain, and others may experience central fatigue which may be experienced with mental fatigue, increased sleep requirement, difficulty maintaining wakefulness, difficulty with word finding, and emotional factors such as difficulty with anxiety and depression. I mention all this because I feel that central fatigue has been my most difficult problem, and yet this type of fatigue is probably the least understood.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about Depression
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD
Original Publication: SJU Polio mailing list.
Abstract/Extract: Manic depression (bipolar disorder) is primarily a genetic (predisposition) biochemical disorder that occurs separately from post polio syndrome. At least there are a lot more people with bipolar disorder than PPS and more people with PPS that do not have bipolar disorder. If you have both, it is like having PPS and another disorder such as diabetes.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about Doctors
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD
Original Publication: SJU Polio mailing list.
Abstract/Extract: I have read the recent postings by Nancy, Sara, and Tony and I will attempt to respond with some thoughts. I still have opportunity to teach interviewing skills to second year medical students at the School of Medicine of the Medical College of VA. This school prides itself on educating and producing clinicians as opposed to research oriented doctors. This school built on hills and certainly not barrier free in 1962 accepted me and I was fortuate to win a National Foundation Health Scholarship to pay my way. My MCV class had its 30th reunion last April and everyone present was involved in patient care, either primary care or speciality care. When I see the 2nd year students, they are usually likeable, caring, genuine, and somewhat niave (and yes, unspoiled). They come from diverse economic, ethic, and racial backgrounds. Currently, close to 40% are women. They seem motivated to enter a medical career for admirable and what I would call the right reasons. What happens to them during the next seven or eight years (completing medical school and a four to six year residency) can change many of them, sometimes unfortuately for the worse.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about Dorothea Lange
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD
Original Publication: Central Va PPS Support Group (PPSG)'s newsletter, The Deja View, in 1999.
Abstract/Extract: Several months ago, I was watching a program on the History Channel. The program focused on the 1930s, the Great Depression years. Dorothea Lange was the subject of the documentary. Lange achieved some fame as a result of her many photos of individuals who were directly affected by the poverty and deprivations of the economic depression. When discussing Lange's life, the narrator mentioned that Lange had polio as a child.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about dreams
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD
Original Publication: SJU Polio mailing list.
Abstract/Extract: With PPS which we experience every day, we can all have dreams symbolic about this real stress in our lives and consequently, the reality of PPS can no doubt trigger past symbols of the original polio event and thus we could have dreams back in time about having polio.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about Falling
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD
Original Publication: Central Va PPS Support Group (PPSG)'s newsletter, The Deja View, in 1996.
Abstract/Extract: On January 6, 1996, we had a shortened meeting because the Blizzard of '96 began that afternoon around 2 P.M. As you also know, our February meeting was canceled because of the slice (snow, sleet, and ice) storm. The few brave or foolish souls that were present for the January 6th meeting did engage in a lively discussion about falling, no doubt inspired by the vision of snow falling outside of Sheltering Arms Hospital. Some of us have vivid and unforgettable memories of falls we had in our youth because of the residual effects of polio, and others have equally memorable accounts of falls that we have had because of the effects of post polio syndrome. An additional problem now is that we are older and probably do not fall as gracefully as we once did. Also, the risk is greater for injury because of weaker muscles, softer bones, and the same factors of aging that everyone experiences. Falling is no fun, but dealing with its reality may build character.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about F.D.R and P.P.S.
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD
Original Publication: Polio Life mailing list.
Abstract/Extract: Regarding whether FDR had signs and symptoms of PPS, in retrospect, I believe he did show signs of PPS at least during the last year of his life. I have read Dr. Howard Bruenn's (FDR's cardiologist) medical article on FDR's illness. This article was published in the Annals of Internal Medicine in 1972.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about "Henry's Helpful Hints for Living with Post-Polio Syndrome"
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD.
Original Publication: Central Va PPS Support Group (PPSG)'s newsletter, The Deja View, in June/July 2000.
Abstract/Extract: When I was three years old, my mother became a victim of Schizophrenia. She never recovered. When I was eleven years old, I had paralytic polio. I partially recovered. These two life events were major factors in guiding my life toward a career as a physician and a psychiatrist. For at least the last decade, I have struggled with Post-Polio Syndrome (PPS). Most of you are quite familiar with all of the manifestations of that struggle. For almost six years, I have had the privilege of being the president of the Central Virginia Post-Polio Support Group, a marvelous group. As a result, I have had the pleasure and challenge to communicate with hundreds of PPSers around the world. I think I have learned a lot about PPS and the people who are living with this life changing disorder. In this article, I will attempt to share what I am calling Helpful Hints for Living with Post-Polio Syndrome. Many of these hints are similar to what is now called "mind - body" medicine. Many of them are replicated in other lists and articles. I offer these hints for your review, reflection, and response. This list represents only my opinion and is not to be interpreted as anything more than that.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about Massive Denial
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD.
Original Publication: Central Va PPS Support Group (PPSG)'s newsletter, The Deja View, in 1998.
Abstract/Extract: Denial is a word that is frequently overused in American life. We hear it used as it pertains to the method in which many substance abusers or their codependent spouses cope. Elizabeth Kubler Ross identified denial as one of the early stages in the process of dying from a terminal illness such as cancer. In the book of Matthew in the New Testament, even Jesus advocates self-denial as a virtue when he says, "If any man will come after me, let him deny himself, and take up his cross, and follow me." The dictionary offers several definitions for denial such as rejection of a request, refusal to admit the truth of a statement or charge, disavowal, and restrictions on one's own activity or desires. Perhaps all of us, at one time or another, have exercised denial in these four ways. In the psychodynamic world, denial is recognized as a defense mechanism. What is a defense mechanism? A defense mechanism is defined as an unconscious intrapsychic process serving to provide relief from emotional conflict and anxiety. Conscious efforts are often made for similar reasons, but most defense mechanisms are unconscious, meaning that their use is not a rational, willful cognitive function of our personalities. Denial is one of at least 17 recognized unconscious defense mechanisms of our personalities. As a defense mechanism, denial is defined as an unconscious process used to resolve emotional conflict and allay anxiety by disavowing thoughts, feelings, wishes, needs, or external reality factors that are consciously intolerable.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about Medical Records
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD
Original Publication: SJU Polio mailing list.
Abstract/Extract: There has been much discussion regarding the saving and destroying of medical records. I believe the regulations vary from state to state. In Virginia, when a doctor retires or dies, he or she is required to maintain the records of patients for at least five years. Most doctors and hospitals keep them much longer for their own protection. There are some exceptions. With the assessibility of records to so many outsiders (insurance companies, gatekeepers, lawyers, etc), I would suspect that many doctors do thin their records after five or seven years for old patients that have not been seen in that time. Those doctors may feel that destroying records somehow protects them. In VA, the statute of limitations is two years for malpractice suits. A claim for malpractice needs to filed within two years of the event, but there are always legal loopholes to some of this.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about Medication and Psychotherapy
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD
Original Publication: SJU Polio mailing list.
Abstract/Extract: In my experience, any disease process may require a combination of talk therapy and medication or other treatments (surgery, rehab, Pt etc). Most so called mental illnesses are more clearly involving a biological component.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about Michael's Tune
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD
Original Publication: Central Va PPS Support Group (PPSG)'s newsletter, The Deja View, in 1999.
Abstract/Extract: I have commented in previous articles how the event of polio in history has entered my life when I least expected it. Last October 30 (1998) , the Rochester Cathedral Choir from Rochester England performed a concert at my church. An information sheet was provided regarding the various pieces performed and the composers. I scanned this information and noticed under the biographical sketch for Herbert Howells the following: "He was deeply affected by two events: hearing (with his friend, the composer Ivor Gurney) the first performance of Vaughan Williams' "Fantasia on a Theme of Thomas Talis" in Gloucester Cathedral; and the death from polio, at the age of nine, of his son, Michael (after whom he named his tune for the hymn "All My Hope On God Is Founded")." The death of his son from polio jumped off the page at me. I began a little research into this event in the life of Herbert Howells (1892-1983).

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about Normalcy
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD.
Original Publication: Central Va PPS Support Group (PPSG)'s newsletter, The Deja View, in 1997.
Abstract/Extract: In trying to understand something about the psychological effects of polio, we have often heard how most polio victims exercised and worked vigorously to regain a sense of being normal. In a general sense, this usually meant trying to achieve a level of physical function and social function that was nearly equal to the pre-polio level of function and achievement. Many times this goal was unreachable in measurable physical function. For example, President Franklin Roosevelt firmly believed that he would walk again after his initial polio attack. He actively engaged in physical therapy for seven years trying to walk again. He never walked again, but he did manage to walk for short distances with the assistance of two long leg braces, a cane, and a companion's arm. A mystery does arise in attempting to explain the psychological impact that this tremendous effort made on the psyche and personalities of hosts of young polio victims.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about pain and temperature perception
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD
Original Publication: SJU Polio mailing list.
Abstract/Extract: The perception of pain, temperature, touch, and propriaception (or one's position in space like standing still with your arms outstretched, eyes closed and still have ability to touch your nose with your forefinger, one of the tests for drunkeness) are all functions of the central nervous system (brain and spinal cord). The polio virus attacked the central nervous system and may have done more damage to this system than originally thought because of the great recoveries.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about Polio and Economic Status
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD
Original Publication: SJU Polio mailing list.
Abstract/Extract: There has been considerable discussion regarding the occurrence of polio and economic status. The consensus on this list [ SJU Polio] seems to be that the poor were more likely to have acquired a natural immunity and the middle and upper class folks were more vulnerable to polio because they were less likely to acquire this natural immunity.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about Polio Encelphalitis
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD
Original Publication: SJU Polio mailing list.
Abstract/Extract: Many of the posters on this list have mentioned being in comas for a few days, having double vision, breathing and swallowing difficulties, etc with the original infection. Most of us had headaches and tender necks (meningeal irritation) and these symptoms would be compatible with an encephalitis at the time of the original infection. In regard to PPS brain fatigue, many of us have word finding problems, concentration problems, and mental focusing problems when our brains are fatigued. I believe it is true that there have been some findings of highlighting of certain brain areas on MRI's of patients with mental signs of central or brain fatigue. Hopefully, some of these mysteries will be unraveled in the next several years.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about Polio Literature
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD.
Original Publication: Central Va PPS Support Group (PPSG)'s newsletter, The Deja View, in 1999.
Abstract/Extract: As an infectious disease, historical evidence would indicate that polio has been in existence for over five thousand years. However, over these many centuries, the literature on polio has been limited. In this century there has been more in the medical literature about polio as a result of the epidemics that began in the early part of this century. With the development of the Salk and Sabin vaccines, the medical literature regarding polio quickly vanished. Now, with the reality of Post-Polio Syndrome (PPS), the literature, both medical, non-fiction and fiction has increased in the last decade.

Includes a list of 56 polio and post-polio related book titles with individual title links to a selection of major online bookstores

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about Polio Spouses
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD.
Original Publication: Central Va PPS Support Group (PPSG)'s newsletter, The Deja View, in 1999.
Abstract/Extract: Eleanor Roosevelt is probably the most famous polio spouse of this century. She was born into an aristocratic family on November 7, 1884. However, emotional losses and low self-esteem plagued her developmental years. She was the oldest child and only daughter of Elliott Roosevelt, President Theodore Roosevelt's brother, and his beautiful and vivacious wife, Anna Livingston Ludlow Hall. At age two and a half, she was crossing the Atlantic with her parents when their ship was involved in a collision. The terror of being lowered from on high to a lifeboat left her with a fear of heights and the water. As a young child, her mother called her "Granny" because she was so serious and mature. When she was six, her mother said, "You have no looks, so see to it that you have good manners." As a result, Eleanor tried to be dutiful, compliant, obedient, responsible, and useful, but she was also independent, goal directed, and willful.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes more on Post Polio Brain Fatigue
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD.
Original Publication: Central Va PPS Support Group (PPSG)'s newsletter, The Deja View, in 1998.
Abstract/Extract: I have written in the past about post-polio brain fatigue. This symptom complex that many of us experience involves a feeling of total body fatigue, difficulty remaining alert, word finding problems, concentration difficulties, and occasional forgetfulness. These problems are usually absent when we are well rested. In the November/December issue of the newsletter of the Florida East Coast Post-Polio Support Group, there is an article written by Donald Peck Leslie, MD, of the Shepherd Center, Inc. of Atlanta, Georgia entitled "POST- POLIO FATIGUE: WHAT IS IT? WHAT CAN WE DO ABOUT IT." It is a lengthy article that summarizes the development of PPS and many of the theories regarding the causes of PPS. I was particular interested in some of the information relating to PPS brain fatigue and will attempt to relate it to you.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about PPS and The Toddler Mystique
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD.
Original Publication: Central Va PPS Support Group (PPSG)'s newsletter, The Deja View, in 1999.
Abstract/Extract: Several years ago at one of our support group's regular monthly meetings, we divided into three groups based on our age when we had acute polio. One group was age five and under, one was age 6 to 18, and one was over 18. We discussed our memories of the acute polio experience.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about post tramatic stress disorder
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD
Original Publication: SJU Polio mailing list.
Abstract/Extract: In regard to PPS, one could be experiencing all types of PTSD, acute, chronic, and delayed. Also, the PPS could be a provocator for PTSD related to the original acute polio infection, especially in those who had polio as young children and have little conscious memory of the event, or have fragments of memory such as being separated from parents.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about Recovered Memories
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD.
Original Publication: Central Va PPS Support Group (PPSG)'s newsletter, The Deja View, in 1998.
Abstract/Extract: It is not the purpose of this essay to discuss the pros and cons of recovered memories in a therapeutic or legal setting. I am more interested in the possibility or even probability of recovered memories of early childhood polio. I have noticed that many polio survivors have a renewed interest in memories of their acute polio experience as a result of their now dealing with Post-Polio Syndrome (PPS).

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about Reductionism
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD.
Original Publication: Central Va PPS Support Group (PPSG)'s newsletter, The Deja View, in 1998.
Abstract/Extract: Have you wondered how much more your life can be reduced by Post-Polio Syndrome (PPS) and yet, you could still retain some quality to your life? Have you wondered if PPS will likely shorten your life span? Have you wondered if PPS could progress to a state where you would be more dependent and require caretakers? Have you wondered if a progression in your PPS condition could result in alienation from family and friends and a more depressed life style? Have you wondered if some new medical finding or treatment might result in an effective treatment for us? Perhaps you have wondered and pondered all of these queries. I know I have.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about running
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD.
Original Publication: Central Va PPS Support Group (PPSG)'s newsletter, The Deja View, in 1996.
Abstract/Extract: Many of you probably recall seeing the award winning film, "Chariots of Fire" which was a somewhat historical story about two English track stars of the 1924 Olympic games. One was a Jew and one was a Christian. Each eventually won a gold medal, and had something to prove of a personal nature.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about Science and Us
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD
Original Publication: Polio-Life mailing list.
Abstract/Extract: I have observed that considerable discussion has resulted from some postings by scientific minds. I have known many scientific minds and have been involved in clinical research in the past. As a group, most scientific researchers that I have met and known are imaginative, creative, inquistive, bright people who usually have an appreciation for the arts, nature and even religion. One has to have some investigative imagination to develop a theory or postulate. Yes, much of scientific discovery is trial and error.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about SISTER KENNY: POLIO PIONEER
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD
Original Publication: Central Va PPS Support Group (PPSG)'s newsletter, The Deja View, in 1997.
Abstract/Extract: With more and more polio survivors beginning to recall their own personal histories concerning their respective experiences with polio, there is also more interest in some of the polio pioneers who labored before the discovery of the vaccines by Salk and Sabin. One of these pioneers was Sister Elizabeth Kenny. I have always remembered her name and decided to determine if she ever wrote anything. To my surprise, she wrote an autobiography in 1943 entitled And They Shall Walk. The Richmond Library had one copy, and I checked it out and read the book.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about spinal taps
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD
Original Publication: SJU Polio mailing list.
Abstract/Extract: One of the diagnostic criteria for PPS is to exclude other causes of the familiar symptoms such as musculoskeletal pain, new motor weakness, and fatigue. Many disorders can cause one or all of these symptoms. To me one of the most helpful differentiating criteria in the diagnosis of PPS is a history of acute poliomyelitis years ago. Any doctor should at least think about PPS once he/she obtains a history of acute polio in connection with these symptoms. There still would likely be some indication to rule other possible causes of these symptoms such as some infectious, metabolic, cerebrovascular, dementing disorder. A spinal tap may be part of this rule out process.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about the thyroid gland
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD
Original Publication: SJU Polio mailing list.
Abstract/Extract: For years doctors have prescribed supplemental thyroid to individuals whose blood levels of thyroid are low normal. It has even been used by some as a supplemental treatment for depression. Thus it would not be that unusual to add supplemental thyroid to the drug regimen for trying to treat the fatigue symptoms of PPS as long as the blood level of thyroid harmone did not exceed the normal range.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about the Time and Contrast
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD.
Original Publication: Central Va PPS Support Group (PPSG)'s newsletter, The Deja View, in 1997.
Abstract/Extract: In the 1986 film, "Peggy Sue Got Married", the main character portrayed by Kathleen Turner, is going through a divorce and attends her twenty-fifth high school class reunion. At the reunion event, she is recognized as her class's high school prom queen, and as part of the reunion celebration, she is crowned again on the stage. In the déjà vu (the sensation or illusion that one is seeing what one has seen before) excitement of the event, she faints and when she regains consciousness, she is in lying in a hospital bed, but the year is the Spring of 1960, or twenty-five years earlier when Peggy Sue was a senior in high school. Her life had gone back in TIME twenty-five years, but she had retained total knowledge of the next twenty-five years... The film raises the question of what would we do different if we had a second chance or what we would choose to savor at some time in the past in CONTRAST to what we know now. This might prove to be a perplexing dilemma if we experienced this Peggy Sue phenomenon.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about Urogenital Problems and PPS
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD
Original Publication: Central Va PPS Support Group (PPSG)'s newsletter, The Deja View, in 1997.
Abstract/Extract: Over the last several months, I have read and heard about many PPSers having difficulty with various urogenital problems. Such problems as urinary frequency and urgency, stress incontinence, recurrent urinary tract infections (especially in females), sexual impotency, and failure to achieve orgasm are more common. Many PPSers are reporting these difficulties as beginning some time after they were diagnosed with PPS. Of course these problems can result from other causes. In males, urogenital problems might be caused by prostatic hypertrophy, medication side effects, psychological factors, and other organic causes. In females, these problems might be caused by weakened bladder wall muscles resulting from childbirth, hormone irregularities, medication side effects, psychological problems, and other organic causes. Nevertheless, there seems to be more PPSers with urogenital problems than would be found in a similar age group of non PPSers.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about UTI - Urinary Tract Infection
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD
Original Publication: SJU Polio mailing list.
Abstract/Extract: A UTI is a urinary tract infection. These infections might also be called bladder infections or cystitis.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about the Virginia Polio Epidemic of 1950
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD
Original Publication: Central Va PPS Support Group (PPSG)'s newsletter, The Deja View, in August/September 2000.
Abstract/Extract: I contracted polio on Sunday, September 17, 1950, entered the polio isolation ward on the ninth floor, south wing of the Medical College of Virginia Hospital on Saturday, September 23 and was discharged almost three months later on Monday, December 18. In addition to the isolation ward, I spent time on nine west during post isolation, and the majority of my hospitalization on five south and five west in convalescence and rehabilitation. The event of polio changed my life thereafter. Until recently, I had little interest in the polio events of that year. With help from the Virginia Health Department, Division of Immunization, and newspaper records from Richmond Newspapers, I have learned that 1950 was a record year for polio in Virginia and that Virginia ranked second in the nation in the incidence of polio per capita in 1950.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about The Virtue of Self Denial
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD.
Original Publication: Central Va PPS Support Group (PPSG)'s newsletter, The Deja View, in 1998.
Abstract/Extract: As many of you have probably ascertained by now, I enjoy a good movie. Many of you have probably seen the excellent English film, Sense and Sensibility, based on the novel of the same name by Jane Austen. The book and the film are about a family of three daughters who lose their station in English Society when the father dies and his estate is left to the son of his first wife. The widowed mother and the three daughters are fortunate to be provided a cottage on the grounds of a generous cousin. The story reveals the reality of the absence of rights for women in nineteenth century England. The two older adult daughters have tormented love relationships that stimulate the plot throughout the story. The oldest daughter, Miss Dashwood (Elinor), played by actress Emma Thompson, is the ultimate in self denial... I see many parallels in the practice of self denial and self control as displayed in this film and the similar practices that most of us have developed as a result of our experience in life with polio and now PPS.

[ Index ]

Title: Dr. Henry writes about "You Were There"
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Henry Holland MD.
Original Publication: Central Va PPS Support Group (PPSG)'s newsletter, The Deja View, in 1999.
Abstract/Extract: Do you remember the popular TV show of the 1960s entitled "You Are There" narrated by Walter Cronkite? The show would typically allow the viewer to be an eyewitness to a significant time in history. Let me take you back to March 1954. Summer Polio epidemics had been spreading fear and terror across America and much of the world for several decades. In 1952, only two years previous, a record 60,000 cases of polio had been reported in the USA. Another summer was approaching, but finally, as reported in the news, there was hope for a successful vaccine. Much of the hope ironically depended on monkeys.

[ Index ]

Title: PPS and Intimacy
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Linda Van Aken and Henry Holland MD
Abstract/Extract: Studies for aging show that sex is still a very important part of life even as our endurance decreases and our libidos fade. Humans are very sensual animals and intimacy is often just as important to our emotional well being as all the other things we do to take care of our bodies. Dr. Richard Bruno, a neuro-psychologist and Director of the Post-Polio Institute of the Englewood Hospital and Medical Center in Englewood, New Jersey, has written an article entitled "Sex and Polio Survivors." Dr. Bruno writes "The first step to intimacy and sexuality is recognizing and dealing with the emotional reality of the original polio and any abuse you have experienced because of it. Next, you need to identify your own negative feelings about yourself and stop projecting them into the heads of potential friends and lovers."

[ Index ]

[ Previous ]
[ Catalogue Index ]
[ Next ]

NOTES

It is the intention of the Lincolnshire Post-Polio Network to make all the information we collect available regardless of our views as to it's content. The inclusion of a document in this library should not therefore be in any way interpreted as an endorsement.

People who had polio and are experiencing new symptoms need to be assessed by medical professionals who are experienced in Post-Polio to determine what is wrong and to give correct advice. We can only make these documents available to you. YOU must then take what you believe to be relevant to the medical professional you are seeing. We are collecting and collating everything we can to enable medical professionals to make informed decisions. Other medical conditions must be looked for first, Post-Polio Syndrome is by diagnosis of exclusion.

Whether you are a Polio Survivor, a friend or relation of a Polio Survivor, or a Medical Professional, we would advise you use this catalogue only to assist in determining your reading priorities. Every article in this library is likely to contain information of interest to both Polio Survivors and Medical Professionals.

[ Index ]

[ Reception ][ Library ][ Networking ][ Directory ][ What's New? ]

The Lincolnshire Post-Polio Network
Registered Charity No. 1064177
An Information Service for Polio Survivors and Medical Professionals

[ Contact Details Here ]

The Lincolnshire Post-Polio Network takes great care in the transcription of all information that appears at this site. However, we do not accept liability for any damage resulting directly or otherwise from any errors introduced in the transcription. Neither do we accept liability for any damage resulting directly or otherwise from the information available at this site. The opinions expressed in the documents available at this site are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily constitute endorsement or approval by the Lincolnshire Post-Polio Network.


© Copyright The Lincolnshire Post-Polio Network 1997 - 2010.

Document preparation: Chris Salter, Original Think-tank, Cornwall, United Kingdom.
Last modification: 7th January 2002
Last information content change: 1st February 2010.

Valid HTML 4.0!