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Catalogue [by source]

IMPORTANT NOTES FOR FIRST-TIME READERS

INDEX - P
Pan, Jeffrey, BS.
Panayiotopoulos C.P.
Peach, Paul E., MD
Pentland, Brian, Dr
Perry, Jacquelin, M.D., D.Sc. (Hon)
Petrie, John, Dr. MB FRACP
Pham, Bao T.
Post-Polio Support (Inc) New Zealand
Prasad R.

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Pan, Jeffrey, BS.

For articles with Pan, Jeffrey, BS. as co-author or contributor see the following catalogue entries:

B - Bach, John R., MD
Article: Airway Secretion Clearance by Mechanical Exsufflation for Post-Poliomyelitis Ventilator-Assisted Individuals

[ Index ]

Panayiotopoulos C.P.

For articles with Panayiotopoulos C.P. as co-author or contributor see the following catalogue entries:

L - Lane-Fox Unit
Article: Late functional deterioration following paralytic poliomyelitis

[ Index ]

Peach, Paul E., MD

The Palmyra Post-Polio Clinic was first established in August 1997 by Paul E. Peach, M.D. Dr. Peach has been seeing polio survivors for more than 11 years and, in addition to establishing the Palmyra Clinic, he developed the Post-Polio Clinic at Warm Springs before coming to Albany, Georgia.

Title: Effect of Treatment and Noncompliance on Post-Polio Sequelae
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Paul E. Peach, MD, Stephen Olejnik, PhD
Original Publication: Orthopedics November 1991 Vol 14 No. 11 1199-1203.
Abstract/Extract: In this study of 77 patients with post-polio sequelae (PPS), symptoms and manual test scores on initial evaluation were compared with those at subsequent follow-up evaluations. Patients were divided into three groups based on the degree to which they had complied with clinically recommended interventions: compliers, partial compliers, and noncompliers. At the end of the followup period (2.2 ± 1.2 years), the mean muscle function scores of the entire study group had declined - l.5%, which represented a decline of -0.7% annually. On follow-up evaluations, the complier group had realized an improvement or resolution of post-polio symptoms, and also an improvement in muscle function of +0.6% annually. The partial complier group had realized either no improvement, or improvement in post-polio symptoms, but showed a further decline in muscle function of -3.0%, or an annual decline of -1.3%. The noncomplier group showed either no change, or a worsening of post-polio symptoms, and also showed a further decline in muscle function of - 4.1% which represented an annual decline of - 2.0%.

[ Index ]

Title: Pain And Post-Polio Syndrome - An Overview
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Paul E. Peach, MD.
Original Publication: Unknown. Received from Dr. Peach July 1999.
Abstract/Extract: Polio survivors, not unlike the general population, will likely experience pain at some points in their lives due to a myriad of reasons. Unlike the general population, however, polio survivors are somewhat more likely to experience pain as a consequence of the residual paralysis or paresis of chronic polio. If a polio survivor is experiencing pain, this does not necessarily mean that the pain is a symptom of post-polio syndrome. Taking this yet one step further, even if a polio survivor has been appropriately diagnosed with post-polio syndrome and is experiencing pain, this does not necessarily mean that the pain is due to the symptoms of post-polio syndrome. If pain is being experienced, it is essential that an appropriate medical evaluation be made because the pain could be due to any number of factors ranging from very benign to quite serious.

[ Index ]

Pentland Brian, Dr

Title: Survey of the Late Effects of Polio in Lothian
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): B. Pentland, D. J. Hellawell, J. Benjamin, R. Prasad
Original Publication: Rehabilitation Studies Unit, Charles Bell Pavilion, Astley Ainslie Hospital, 33 Grange Loan, Edinburgh EH9 2HL. January 1999
Abstract/Extract: The Edinburgh Branch of the British Polio Fellowship (BPF) expressed the concern of members that the medical and related professions often appeared unfamiliar with the late consequences of polio and that services were not meeting their needs. In an attempt to determine the number of people affected and the nature of their experience, this postal survey was done in 1998. A set of questionnaires were sent to 221 people, in Edinburgh and the Lothians, who had been identified as suffering polio in the past from those known to the BPF and hospital records. There were 125 replies which constituted the study population: 60% were female; the median age was 59 years; and the median time since original diagnosis was 51 years.

[ Index ]

Perry, Jacquelin, M.D., D.Sc. (Hon)

Dr. Perry is located at the Rancho Los Amigos Medical Center, Downey, CA, USA.
Dr. Jacquelin Perry - Biographical Details

Title: Findings in Post-Poliomyelitis Syndrome
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Jacquelin Perry, M.D., James D. Fontaine, M.D. and Sara Mulroy, PH.D., P.T., Downey, California
Original Publication: The Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery Vol. 77-A, No. 8, August 1995, 1148-1153
Abstract/Extract: The purpose of this study was to identify overuse of muscles and other alterations in the mechanics of gait in twenty-one patients who had muscular dysfunction as a late consequence of poliomyelitis. All of the patients had good or normal strength (grade 4 or 5) of the vastus lateralis and zero to fair strength (grade 0 to 3) of the calf, as determined by manual testing.

Dynamic electromyography was used, while the patients were walking, to quantify the intensity and duration of contraction of the inferior part of the gluteus maximus, the long head of the biceps femoris. the vastus lateralis, and the soleus muscles. Patterns of contact of the foot with the floor, temporal-spatial parameters, and motion of the knee and ankle were recorded.

The principal mechanisms of substitution for a weak calf muscle fell into three groups: overuse of the quadriceps (twelve patients) or a hip extensor (the inferior part of the gluteus maximus in eight patients and the long head of the biceps femoris in four), or both; equinus contracture (twelve patients); and avoidance of loading-response flexion of the knee (five patients). Most patients used more than one method of substitution.

These obervations support the theory that postpoliomyelitis syndrome results from long-term substitutions for muscular weakness that place increased demands on joints, ligaments, and muscles and that treatment -- based on the early identification of overuse of muscles and ligamentous strain -- should aim at modification of lifestyle and include use of a brace.

[ Index ]

Title: The Postpolio Syndrome - An Overuse Phenomenon
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Jacquelin Perry, M.D., Gregory Barnes, B.S., R.P.T. and JoAnne K. Gronley, M.A., R.P.T.
Original Publication: Clinical Orthopaedics and Related Research Volume 233:145-162; August 1988
Abstract/Extract: Persons with good recovery of function following their initial poliomyelitis are now, more than 30 years later, experiencing new weakness, fatigue, and muscle pain. The likelihood of muscle overuse being the cause of this late functional loss was investigated by dynamic electromyography (EMG) and foot-switch stride analysis in 34 symptomatic patients. Manual testing grouped the muscles, with strong (S) encompassing Grades Good (G) and Normal (N) while weak (W) included Fair plus (F+) to zero (0). After testing quadriceps and calf strength, the patients fell into one of four classes: strong quadriceps and calf (SQ/SC) strong quadriceps and weak calf (SQ/WC) weak quadriceps and strong calf (WQ/SC) or combined weak quadriceps and calf (WQ/WC). Quantified EMG; (normalized by the manual muscle test EMG) defined the mean duration and intensity of the quadriceps soleus, lower gluteus maximus, and long head of the biceps femoris during walking. Overuse was defined as values greater than the laboratory normal (mean·+ 1 SD). Each muscle exhibited instances of overuse, normalcy, and sparing. The biceps femoris was the only muscle with dominant overuse (82%). Quadriceps overuse was next in frequency (53%). Soleus activity infrequently exceeded normal function (34%), but this still represented more than twice the intensity and duration of the other muscles. Gluteus maximus action was also seldom excessive (34%). The patients averaged two muscles with excessive use during walking. Gait velocity of the SQ/SC strong group was highest (71% of normal) while the three categories that included weak muscles had walking speeds in the range of 50% of normal. The finding of muscle overuse during a single free-speed walking test that does not attain normal velocity supports the concept of muscle overuse being the cause of the patient's dysfunction.

[ Index ]

Title: Postpoliomyelitis Syndrome: Assessment of Behavioral Features
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Donald L. Freidenberg, David Freeman, Steven J. Huber, Jacquelin Perry, Armin Fischer, Wilfred G. Van Gorp and Jeffrey L. Cummings
Original Publication: Neuropsychiatry, Neuropsychology, and Behavioral Neurology Vol. 2, No. 4, pp 272-281. 1989
Abstract/Extract: Postpoliomyelitis syndrome (PPS) is an increasingly recognized phenomenon characterized by late-onset weakness, pain, and fatigue. Psychiatric and cognitive disturbances have been noted in postpoliomyelitis patients, but the relationship of these symptoms to PPS is unknown. We examined postpoliomyelitis patients with and without PPS using objective neuropsychological and neuropsychiatric procedures. Our results suggest that disturbances of mood were common and that subtle cognitive deficits also occured in postpoliomyelitis patients. However, patients with PPS did not have greater depression or cognitive deficits compared to postpoliomyelitis patients without PPS.

[ Index ]

For articles with P - Perry, Jacquelin, M.D., D.Sc. (Hon) as co-author or contributor see the following catalogue entries:

Gronley, JoAnne K., M.A., R.P.T.
Article: Gait Analysis Techniques

[ Index ]

Petrie, John, Dr. MB FRACP

For articles with Petrie, John, Dr. MB FRACP as co-author or contributor see the following catalogue entries:

L - Leicestershire Post-Polio Network
Article: The Mayo, The Lancet, and The Revolting Polios

[ Index ]

Pham, Bao T.

For articles with Pham, Bao T. as co-author or contributor see the following catalogue entries:

Gawne, Anne Carrington, MD
Article: Electrodiagnostic Findings in 108 Consecutive Patients Referred to a Post-Polio Clinic - The Value of Routine Electrodiagnostic Studies
Halstead, Lauro S., MD
Article: National Rehabilitation Hospital Limb Classification for Exercise, Research, and Clinical Trials in Post-Polio Patients

[ Index ]

Post-Polio Support (Inc) New Zealand

For articles published by Post-Polio Support (Inc) New Zealand see the following catalogue entries:

W - Walker, J.M., Ph.D.
Article: Did you have acute poliomyelitis? An Explanation for Polio Survivors about Post Polio Sequelae
Article: What you should know about your Medications - A guide for Polio Survivors (New Zealand Version)

See also their entry in our International/National/Local Support Organizations Directory

[ Index ]

Prasad R.

For articles with Prasad R. as co-author or contributor see the following catalogue entries:

Pentland B Dr
Article: Survey of the Late Effects of Polio in Lothian

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NOTES

It is the intention of the Lincolnshire Post-Polio Network to make all the information we collect available regardless of our views as to it's content. The inclusion of a document in this library should not therefore be in any way interpreted as an endorsement.

People who had polio and are experiencing new symptoms need to be assessed by medical professionals who are experienced in Post-Polio to determine what is wrong and to give correct advice. We can only make these documents available to you. YOU must then take what you believe to be relevant to the medical professional you are seeing. We are collecting and collating everything we can to enable medical professionals to make informed decisions. Other medical conditions must be looked for first, Post-Polio Syndrome is by diagnosis of exclusion.

"Source" in the context of this catalogue primarily means original author. In a few cases it will be an organisation or conference.

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Document preparation: Chris Salter, Original Think-tank, Cornwall, United Kingdom.
Last modification: 1st February 2010.
Last information content change: 26th February 2001

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