Lincolnshire Post-Polio Library - A Service of The Lincolnshire Post-Polio Network
[ Reception ][ Library ][ Networking ][ Directory ][ What's New? ]
[ Not Used ][ Not Used ][ Not Used ][ Not Used ][ Search Site ]

Catalogue [by source]

IMPORTANT NOTES FOR FIRST-TIME READERS

INDEX - W
Walker, J.M., Ph.D.
Walter, Tom
Westbrook, Mary T, PhD
Wetterqvist, Hakon, MD, PhD
Whelan, A.M., Phar. D
Williams A.J.
Windebank, Anthony J., MD

[ Previous ]
[ Catalogue Index ]
[ Next ]

Walker, J.M., Ph.D.

Title: Did you have acute poliomyelitis? An Explanation for Polio Survivors about Post Polio Sequelae LEAFLET
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): J. M. Walker, PhD, PT, C. Grant, BSC(Physio)
Original Publication: Originally written for Post-Polio Support Society NZ (Inc). Revised 1966.
Abstract/Extract: Discusses What is PPS?, How common is PPS?, Who is at risk for PPS?, Recovery from Polio, What causes PPS? and What can be done?.

[ Index ]

Title: Polio Survivors as Patients - Guide for Emergency Care & Surgical Health Workers LEAFLET
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): J. M. Walker, PhD, PT, C. McGowan & G. Vardy.
Original Publication: Originally written for Nova Scotia Polio Survivors Support Group. 1966.
Abstract/Extract: Discusses Concerns of Polio Survivors that may require attention, Response to Medications, why special attention is needed, Special Considerations for the patient who is a polio survivor & especially those with PPS and Important questions to ask of patients in the Emergency Care setting.

[ Index ]

Title: Post Polio Sequelae: An Explanation for Health Professionals LEAFLET
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): J. M. Walker, PhD, PT, K. Sweet, BSC(Physio)
Original Publication: Originally written for Nova Scotia Polio Survivors Support Group. Revised 1966.
Abstract/Extract: Discusses What is post polio syndrome?, Who is more at risk for PPS?, Why may some polio survivors develop PPS? and What can be done?.

[ Index ]

Title: What you should know about your Medications - A guide for Polio Survivors (New Zealand Version) LEAFLET
[ Full Text Here ] Also reproduced in Issue No.5 - May 1997 of LINC-PIN
Author(s): J.M.Walker Ph.D., PT, AM Whelan, Phar. D, 1996.
UK Version Editor: Andrew Francis Forde MRPharm. B.Sc.Hons
Original Publication: New Zealand version published by Post-Polio Support Society NZ (Inc). Originally written for Nova Scotia Polio Survivors Support Group.
Abstract/Extract: Medications (drugs), may be by prescription (Rx), or Over-The-Counter (OTC). As a polio survivor you should become an informed user of drugs.

[ Index ]

Title: You are going to have surgery - A Guide for Polio Survivors LEAFLET
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): J. M. Walker, PhD, PT.
Original Publication: Originally written for Nova Scotia Polio Survivors Support Group. 1996.
Abstract/Extract: Discusses Why preparation for any surgery may be important, For what types of surgery is this important?, and What to do when surgery is required.

[ Index ]

Walter, Tom

For biographical information and additional articles see Tom Walter's Letter from California.

Title: Pain Relief - Some tips from the collected wisdom of the Internet Polio Mail List
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Assembled by Tom Walter
Abstract/Extract: Assuming the person has been thoroughly checked for any other conditions that could mimic PPS symptoms and be treated -- and that any orthopedic anomalies that could be causing pain have been treated -- here's a partial list of some tips that PPSers have reported seem to work for them, alone or in combination:

[ Index ]

Title: Spinal tap for PPS? NO !!!
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Tom Walter
Abstract/Extract: Over the past couple of years some interesting and exciting discoveries have been made about the polio virus that were unknown before. Researchers at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland (USA) and at the Pasteur Institute in France have been able to identify fragments of mutated polio virus RNA genetic material from the spinal fluid of people who had "wild" polio (like most of us) and from the spinal fluid of those who had the polio vaccines.

[ Index ]

Title: Take a Look at Estrogen - Hormone Therapy May Be Right For Women With PPS
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Tom Walter
Original Publication: SJU Polio mailing list.
Abstract/Extract: Recently I read that nearly half of all post-menopausal women in the United States who are candidates for taking the hormone Estrogen are not doing so. That could be a mistake with long-term consequences for them, and in particular for women with PPS who don't produce Estrogen at all because they've had both ovaries removed or who have a lowered production of Estrogen during and after menopause.

[ Index ]

Title: Terminology
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Tom Walter
Abstract/Extract: Different clinics, doctors, organizations use terms differently, with different meanings or interchangeably, to describe our PPS. And I don't believe there is any general agreement on their meaning. Here's some samples.

[ Index ]

For additional articles with Walter, Tom as co-author or contributor see the following catalogue entries:

A - Anuras, Sinn, MD
Article: Gastrointestinal Involvement In The Post-Polio Syndrome (PPS)
B - Bruno, Richard L., Ph.D.
Article: PPS Questions and Answers, March, 1995

Westbrook, Mary T, PhD

Title: Changes in Post-Polio Survivors Over Five Years: Symptoms and Reactions to Treatments.
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Mary T. Westbrook, PhD
Original Publication: Proceedings of the 12th World Congress, International Federation of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Sydney, March 1995.
Abstract/Extract: A group of 176 people with post-polio syndrome, identified using Ramlow et al's (1992) criteria, took part in a 5 year follow-up survey. Most reported increased muscle weakness (91%), fatigue (91%), muscle pain (80%), joint pain (64%) and changes in walking (60%). Increases in other symptoms occurred in less than half the group. Cramps, sensitivity to cold, muscle atrophy and muscle twitching were the symptoms most likely to have stabilised. The average respondent reported greater difficulty in carrying out 4 of the 8 activities of daily living investigated. Respondents were significantly less anxious and depressed about their condition at follow-up. Degree of post-polio changes reported at the time of the first survey was a better predictor of decline during the five years than were initial polio histories or psycho-social variables. Health practitioners most likely to have been consulted were general practitioners and physiotherapists. Specialists in rehabilitation medicine were rated as providing more beneficial treatment than other medical practitioners. Treatments reported to provide good symptom relief included massage and water activities but not exercise. Life style modifications associated with pacing, reduced activity and rest were particularly effective. Overall 68% of respondents considered there was much they could do to control post-polio symptoms.

[ Index ]

Title: Early Memories Of Having Polio: Survivors' Memories Versus The Official Myths
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Mary T. Westbrook, PhD
Original Publication: Paper presented at the First Australian International Post-Polio Conference, "Living with the Late Affects of Polio",Sydney, November, 1996
Abstract/Extract: This paper discusses the findings of a survey in which polio survivors were asked to write accounts of their early memories of having polio. These recollections will be compared with the views expressed in the two major sources of information about the polio epidemics that occurred earlier this century. These sets of writings, which I will refer to as the "official" views of the polio experience, are firstly, the books and articles written by health practitioners, mainly doctors, physiotherapists and social workers, who treated patients with polio and secondly, the autobiographies and biographies of people who contracted polio. The official accounts will be shown to differ in a number of ways from survivors' memories in that they fail to recognise, ignore or distort aspects of the typical polio experience. In fact, they are what could be designated "official myths" of what it felt like to contract paralytic polio. Finally, I will consider how these myths, or social attitudes, influenced the ways in which survivors have coped with polio and post-polio syndrome.

[ Index ]

Title: The Hassles Of Living With Post-Polio: Some Survival Strategies
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Mary T. Westbrook, PhD
Original Publication: Paper presented at the Polio Consumers Forum, 12th World Congress of the International Federation of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation, Sydney, March 1995
Abstract/Extract: I don't need to elaborate on the hassles of living with post-polio syndrome to most of this audience. As Lorenzo Milam a polio survivor wrote:

When (polio) first picks us up and throws us down, we think that we can beat it. Learn to walk; do it gracefully, so no one will know what little we have. Become independent: how do they say it? 'I'll be my own man'. They never tell us about Phase Two: when the ageing nerves begin to weaken. What we learned to do so smartly after the fire had passed over us, we watch disappear again. Our victories last for ... thirty years - and then the referee comes up to us, blows the whistle, and tells us that we're out, after all. What we gained, we lose (p. 59).

[ Index ]

Title: Post-Polio Syndrome: Where Do We Go From Here?
[ Full Text Here ] Author(s): Mary T. Westbrook, PhD
Original Publication: Paper presented at the final plenary session of the Australian International Post-Polio Conference, Sydney, November, 1996
Abstract/Extract: One overwhelming impression I have from the conference is that we polios are opening up with each other in ways that did not happen in the early days of our support groups. We are acknowledging that dealing with PPS is difficult. We still too frequently downplay our problems and criticise ourselves for not coping more effectively. As one participant said, we need to learn to ask for help and to say 'No' to demands that overtax us. One of the main messages of this conference has been that we need to be caring of ourselves and that we can gain much through mutual friendship and support.

For additional articles with Westbrook, Mary T, PhD as co-author or contributor see the following catalogue entries:

L - Leicestershire Post-Polio Network
Article: The Mayo, The Lancet, and The Revolting Polios

[ Index ]

Wetterqvist, Hakon, MD, PhD

For articles with Wetterqvist, Hakon, MD, PhD as co-author or contributor see the following catalogue entries:

G - Grimby, Gunnar, MD, PhD
Article: Endurance Training Effect on Individuals With Postpoliomyelitis

[ Index ]

Whelan, A.M., Phar. D

For articles with Vardy, G as co-author or contributor see the following catalogue entries:

W - Walker, J.M., Ph.D.
Article: What you should know about your Medications - A guide for Polio Survivors (New Zealand Version)

[ Index ]

Williams A.J.

For articles with Williams A.J. as co-author or contributor see the following catalogue entries:

L - Lane-Fox Unit
Article: Late functional deterioration following paralytic poliomyelitis
Article: Poliomyelitis

[ Index ]

Windebank, Anthony J., MD

For articles with Windebank, Anthony J., MD as co-author or contributor see the following catalogue entries:

L - Leicestershire Post-Polio Network
Article: The Mayo, The Lancet, and The Revolting Polios

[ Index ]
[ Previous ]
[ Catalogue Index ]
[ Next ]

NOTES

It is the intention of the Lincolnshire Post-Polio Network to make all the information we collect available regardless of our views as to it's content. The inclusion of a document in this library should not therefore be in any way interpreted as an endorsement.

People who had polio and are experiencing new symptoms need to be assessed by medical professionals who are experienced in Post-Polio to determine what is wrong and to give correct advice. We can only make these documents available to you. YOU must then take what you believe to be relevant to the medical professional you are seeing. We are collecting and collating everything we can to enable medical professionals to make informed decisions. Other medical conditions must be looked for first, Post-Polio Syndrome is by diagnosis of exclusion.

"Source" in the context of this catalogue primarily means original author. In a few cases it will be an organisation or conference.

[ Top of Page ]

[ Reception ][ Library ][ Networking ][ Directory ][ What's New? ]

The Lincolnshire Post-Polio Network
Registered Charity No. 1064177
An Information Service for Polio Survivors and Medical Professionals

[ Contact Details Here ]

The Lincolnshire Post-Polio Network takes great care in the transcription of all information that appears at this site. However, we do not accept liability for any damage resulting directly or otherwise from any errors introduced in the transcription. Neither do we accept liability for any damage resulting directly or otherwise from the information available at this site. The opinions expressed in the documents available at this site are those of the individual authors and do not necessarily constitute endorsement or approval by the Lincolnshire Post-Polio Network.


Copyright The Lincolnshire Post-Polio Network 1997 - 2010.

Document preparation: Chris Salter, Original Think-tank, Cornwall, United Kingdom.
Last modification: 1st February 2010.
Last information content change: 29th February 2000

Valid HTML 4.0!